Art Should Be Everywhere

Art should be everywhere – or so the gallery site Daylighted declares. As part of this tribute, Daylighted recently chose me as its featured artist of the month.

Daylighted is a service that places visual artist into non-traditional exhibition spaces such as hotels, restaurants, coffee shops and more. It seeks to “change the way you see art. Daylighted transforms places…into digital art galleries and offer[s] them an opportunity to easily display and sell an exclusive collection of art from worldwide and local artists.”

Daylighted featured my nostalgic photography, including the images in my updated monograph: “See Saw: How Once We Looked.”

Sports team
Celebrate

You can view and purchase more images on the Daylighted site, at: https://www.daylighted.com/explore/artist/MichaelPhilipManheim

These images reflect my overall fascination with movement as well as with light, that showed in the photographs I created in my early teens. I see that I developed reflexively and intuitively, in capturing the essence of a moment. I see that the innate compositional sense expanded into a style. And so on, all insights offering me a chance to pause and reflect as I go forward.

See-Saw, A Sampler of How Once We Looked, is now available for purchase at Amazon.com at this link: http://a.co/fSP97AQ

Politics in 1960

When Nixon And Kennedy Competed For The Presidency

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All images Copyright ©1960 Michael Philip Manheim. All Rights Reserved.

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Nixon rally at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia in 1960

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Vice President (For 8 years under Dwight D. Eisenhower) Richard M. Nixon ran against Senator John F. Kennedy in the closest election since 1916.

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Kennedy was the youngest President at age 43 and the first Catholic.  His win came from an Electoral College vote.

Kennedy proved a media master.  Theirs was the first televised presidential debate, and image played a role.  Three of these photographs seem to telegraph a feeling for the times and for that would-be urbane college crowd.

What do you think?

 

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