The Smoking Fifties

girl smoking

Back in the 1950s, smoking was fashionable. Ads even touted health benefits. I was experimenting with lighting effects during that time. Pat was a smoker, so we got together to create this photograph.

 

The past and the present are closer than we often realize,so I’m going back into the archives to see what I saw long ago First up is this sampling of my documentary photography, a nostalgic collection of How Once We Looked. I’ve selected images that seem memorable, from the perspective of a life spent pursuing my passion. Here’s how the See-Saw collection now appears on Amazon:

http://a.co/4zsuZb2

A Boy Lost in Play

boy on top of cannon

I call this Reverie, a boy lost in play at Artillery Park in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. I was out strolling with camera, came upon him out with his grandfather, and moved in until this composition appeared just as his expression put him in another world.

 

The past and the present are closer than we often realize,so I’m going back into the archives to see what I saw long ago First up is this sampling of my documentary photography, a nostalgic collection of How Once We Looked. I’ve selected images that seem memorable, from the perspective of a life spent pursuing my passion. Here’s how the See-Saw collection now appears on Amazon:

http://a.co/4zsuZb2

Feelings

“The historian will tell you what happened. The novelist will tell you what it felt like.” —-E. L. Doctorow

Such a pleasure, to capture feelings and not only the competition.  The play is over, but not the photography.  What a wonderful show of sportsmanship after a hard fought high school football game.

Sportsmanship

Was the game over?  Sure was, but staying alert as a photographer never ends.

View more images at: http://www.michaelphilipmanheim.com/see-saw/

 

Delightful Instants

Capturing a Moment in Time

Delightful Instants

In an era of flashbulbs and press cameras, I was exploring what available light had to offer. It presented the world as we saw it, without the harsh effect of a single flash. Both techniques froze a moment that goes by in a blur.

Photographing peak action stopped the movement at its height.  It allowed slow shutter speeds in an era of slow films. And it preserved a feeling forever.

 

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